River Otter Consortium

Relations between otters and mice have never been friendly, what with wild otters tending to eat mice pups, but the relationship has changed over the last 200 years. In 971, the rough-and-tumble otter clans of the rivers, lakes, and seashores, came together under the leadership of one Javier Penoza. The otter captain proposed a set of standardized rules for the clans to ease some of the internecine conflict, the central tenet of which was a common currency.

From then on, otters worked to develop an economic system. Today, they trade and speculate amongst each other, building stores of wealth. Mice have never been keen on the idea of interest and loans, so most mayors and governors have made it a policy never to borrow. But some shoreside communities have started to hire out space on otter barges, and these business arrangements usually go smoothly.

Otters have a language that is much quicker than mouse, and it takes a quick-witted mouse to learn it and keep up in conversation. Much of the vocabulary is based on transactions, with words like “road” translated as “trade route,” and “infant” as “familial investment.”

River Otter Consortium

Mouse Squad 1163 kingsley_zissou2